State

Prison cell bars(Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto)

MADISON – After a brief reprieve from a rising inmate population, Wisconsin’s prisons are on track to hold a record number of people by 2019 as the state’s violent crime rate continues to increase.

The rising inmate population is fueled by a boost in admissions and tougher sentences, according to a review by the nonpartisan Wisconsin Taxpayers Alliance.

The state Department of Corrections expects to have 23,233 inmates by June 2019 — slightly above the record 23,184 it held in 2007.

After years of increases, the state’s prison population began to decline in 2008. It was a welcome relief to budget watchers, who saw the prison population nearly triple in the 1990s and continue to rise after that.

But since 2013, the population has been moving up again, the taxpayers group found in a report to be made public this week.

Running Wisconsin’s prisons is expected to cost about $1.1 billion for each of the next two years.

Wisconsin Attorney General Brad Schimel.(Photo: Associated Press)

MADISON – Under fire from conservatives, Wisconsin Attorney General said this week an investigation into voter fraud remained open, contradicting comments he made hours earlier that the probe had been closed.

Schimel suggested his investigators may yet review more than 100 hours of undercover video shot by Project Veritas Action, a group run by conservative activist James O’Keefe.

“It’s not the end of it,” the Republican attorney general said Thursday on “The Mark Belling Show” on WISN-AM (1130).

Schimel’s office released a memo this week from an investigator saying he found no violations of Wisconsin laws. Just hours before he claimed the investigation had not been shut down, Schimel told the Wisconsin Radio Network the memo had been released because the investigation was closed.

Schimel spokesman Johnny Koremenos on Friday said the memo had been released in error and declined to answer other questions.

Wisconsin Attorney General Brad Schimel.(Photo: Associated Press)

MADISON – Under fire from conservatives, Wisconsin Attorney General said this week an investigation into voter fraud remained open, contradicting an aide who said the probe had been closed.

Schimel suggested his investigators may yet review more than 100 hours of undercover video shot by Project Veritas Action, a group run by conservative activist James O’Keefe.

“It’s not the end of it,” the Republican attorney general said Thursday on “The Mark Belling Show” on WISN-AM (1130).

Schimel’s office released a memo this week from an investigator saying he found no violations of Wisconsin laws. Schimel's office had declined to release investigation records in response to earlier requests because the probe remained open, but an aide to Schimel said Friday the memo was released this week because it had been shut down.

At issue is a series of videos O'Keefe released leading up to last year's presidential election that O'Keefe claims reveal a voter fraud scheme and other crimes.

Wisconsin Attorney General Brad Schimel.(Photo: Associated Press)

MADISON – Under fire from conservatives, Wisconsin Attorney General said this week an investigation into voter fraud remained open, contradicting an aide who said the probe had been closed.

Schimel suggested his investigators may yet review more than 100 hours of undercover video shot by Project Veritas Action, a group run by conservative activist James O’Keefe.

“It’s not the end of it,” the Republican attorney general said Thursday on “The Mark Belling Show” on WISN-AM (1130).

Schimel’s office released a memo this week from an investigator saying he found no violations of Wisconsin laws. Schimel's office had declined to release investigation records in response to earlier requests because the probe remained open, but an aide to Schimel said Friday the memo was released this week because it had been shut down.

At issue is a series of videos O'Keefe released leading up to last year's presidential election that O'Keefe claims reveal a voter fraud scheme and other crimes.

Rep. Mark Pocan during opening remarks at the Congressional field hearing on the Tomah Veterans Affairs Medical Center at Cranberry Country Lodge in Tomah, Wis., Monday, March 30, 2015.(Photo: Megan McCormick/News-Herald Media)

Assessing the makeup of his workplace, U.S. Rep. Mark Pocan said this:

In Congress, "on the Democratic side of the room, you’ve got men and women of all different races; on the other side, you’ve got a bunch of white men in dark suits, all over 55 or so."

PolitiFact Wisconsin finds that the Madison-area Democrat is largely on target.