News

By Dennis Thompson

MONDAY, Feb. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- One-quarter of U.S. teen e-cigarette users have experimented with "dripping" -- a new vaping method that produces thicker clouds of vapor, researchers report.

Regular produce inhalable vapor by gradually drawing liquid into a heating coil through an automatic wick, explained lead researcher Suchitra Krishnan-Sarin.

"Dripping" involves placing drops of e-liquid directly onto the exposed heating coil of an e-cigarette or atomizer, and then immediately inhaling the cloud of vapor produced, said Krishnan-Sarin, a professor of at Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Conn.

"They say it makes the flavors taste better and gives you a stronger hit," Krishnan-Sarin said.

She said she learned about the practice while talking with teenagers, and decided to ask about it in a survey on e-cigarette use among high school students.

The survey revealed that 26 percent of student e-cigarette users at eight Connecticut high schools had tried dripping at least once.

Feb. 6, 2017 -- Possible contamination with pentobarbital has led to the recall of certain lots of 12-oz Hunk of Beef dog food.

Dogs that consume pentobarbital can suffer drowsiness, dizziness, excitement, loss of balance, nausea, and possibly death.

The recalled lots of dog food were made during the week of June 6-13, 2016, and distributed to retail locations and sold online in Washington, California, Minnesota, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, Massachusetts, Maryland, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida.

The recall includes products with lot numbers that start with 1816E03HB, 1816E04HB, 1816E06HB, 1816E07HB, and 1816E13HB, and have an expiration date of June 2020. The second half of the barcode reads 20109, which can be found on the back of the product label.

For more information, contact the company at 1-847-537-0102.

       

By Randy Dotinga

             

THURSDAY, Feb. 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Painkillers like aspirin, Aleve and Advil don't help most people with back pain, a new review finds.

The researchers estimated that only one in six people gained a benefit from taking these nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

Meanwhile, previous research has suggested that another common painkiller, Tylenol (acetaminophen), isn't very useful either, the study authors added.

The findings raise the prospect that no over-the-counter painkillers really ease back pain, at least in the short term, and some may raise the risk of gastrointestinal problems.

"There are other effective and safer strategies to manage spinal pain," said review author Gustavo Machado. He is a research fellow with the George Institute for Global Health in Sydney, Australia.

Back and neck pain are the leading cause of pain worldwide, the researchers said.

Feb. 2, 2017 -- The threat of metal objects has prompted a recall of some varieties of Skoal, Copenhagen, Cope and Husky brand smokeless , the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says.

The agency said all the recalled products were produced at U.S. Smokeless Tobacco Company's facility in Franklin Park, Illinois, the Associated Press reported.

A list of the recalled products is on the FDA website, and customers who bought them can return them for a refund.

By Robert Preidt

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A more satisfying sex life may be only a good night's away for women over 50, new research finds.

Researchers led by Dr. Juliana Kling of the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., tracked data from nearly 94,000 women aged 50 to 79.

The investigators found that 31 percent had , and a little more than half (56 percent) said they were somewhat or very satisfied with their sex life.

But too little -- fewer than seven to eight hours a night -- was linked with a lower likelihood of sexual satisfaction, the findings showed.

"This is a very important study since it examines a question which has tremendous potential impact on women's lives," said Dr. Jill Rabin, who reviewed the findings. She's co-chief of the Program at Northwell Health in New Hyde Park, N.Y.

By Alan Mozes

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A small study suggests that people who use e-cigarettes regularly may face an increased risk for .

Researchers said they found that 23 e-cigarette users were more likely to have two early indicators of risk than 19 people who did not "vape."

"This is the first study to look at these cardiac risk factors in habitual e-cigarette users. The results were a bit surprising, since it is widely believed that e-cigarettes are less harmful than cigarettes," said study co-author Dr. Holly Middlekauff. She is a professor with the division of cardiology at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Instead, she said, "we found the same types of abnormalities in our e-cigarette users that are reported in tobacco cigarette smokers, and these abnormalities are associated with increased cardiac risk."

Middlekauff stressed that the study only shows an association, not a cause-and-effect link, between e-cigarette use and increased heart risks.

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